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Expert Presentation Tips from “The Communicator,” Gina London

At Haiku Deck, we’re all about helping you make presentations like an expert and, as part of that mission, we’re always searching for accomplished communicators and presenters from around the world. I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Gina London, an Emmy winning former CNN correspondent and anchor who is now an internationally recognized communications strategist and consultant.  Author, speaker and writer of the weekly business column, “The Communicator” in Ireland’s largest circulated newspaper, The Sunday Independent, Gina is a Director with Fuzion Communications and an American who now calls Ireland home. Here’s what she had to say about delivering your message like an expert:

What is something you learned as a CNN correspondent and anchor that helps you with your communication clients?

Above all, I know how to take any topic and break it down into a memorable story and deliver it confidently.

The rigor of CNN’s 24-hour news cycle made me extremely adept at crystalizing. This means more than oversimplifying, it’s the skill to be able to synthesize the main points of something complex.

Too often,  business professionals “over-present.”  Their audience is taken on a meandering brain dump of information overload that leaves them guessing at the presenter’s main point, or perhaps worse, inferring the take-away on their own.

To be an effective communicator in the business world, you must be able to strategize about the main point your particular audience needs to know and then connect on that.   

If you had to name one thing that most communicators could do to improve the way their message lands, what would it be?

Hook any informational point to a human, emotional story.

I learned in CNN anchor training school – yes, there is such a thing – to remember that behind any story – no matter how seemingly dry – there are hopes, dreams or fears.

As a journalist, that didn’t mean to evoke or over dramatize, but to keep the real people in your audience top of mind.

In business, it’s the same.  Until the robots take over, real human people are in the room with you as a presenter.  So, I urge my executive clients to connect any point they want to make to a personal anecdote, illustration or example.

“Stories make messages stick” goes the cliché.  But it’s true.  Science shows that our brain lights up more receptors when we’re told stories that include additional sensory areas like descriptions of weather, feelings, vacations. Things we relate to on a human level.

When you give talks, what topics do you cover? (can you include links to any of your Haiku Decks for us to embed in the blog post?)

From Lagos, to London to Austin to Cairo, in addition to assisting my clients in crafting their own dynamic presentations, I speak at conferences all around the world on a wide-variety of communications and confidence topics.

I’ve presented on helping science and tech professionals connect with broader audiences to improving work-life balance, developing your professional and personal brand and taking control of your body language.  Crisis communications. The power of story-telling. Employee engagement. How not to sound like a robot. If it has to do with communications, I’m there!

I like my slides to be enhance and embroider what I say.  The themes of my images add another layer of interest to my talk.  Here’s my deck that recently backed me up for a lively, interactive presentation before the Dublin Chamber of Commerce. You’ll see, I chose a lot of funny, vintage shots for this one.

Network Dublin Body Language Nov 2016 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

But I don’t always.   My recent work/life balance presentation used shots from Cirque du Soleil as I talked about how we can all learn to “juggle.” Get it? Ha. Never mind. I promise, it was a fun presentation too. Oh, and I actually juggled three oranges at the end of it. Really. And didn’t drop.

As a public speaker, what are three things you do to get ready for a successful presentation?

I use the “AIM” approach and coach my clients to do this too.  AIM stands for Audience, Intent, Message.

First, really analyze who is in your audience. What are their hopes, dreams and fears? How can you best connect with them?  Put them first!  Then narrow your intent to a single action. What do you want your audience to really take away from your presentation? Too often, I find presenters don’t have this clearly defined and they try to do too much.

Finally, after deciding around points one and two, I craft a story to deliver a message that connects, captivates and is clear.

If you’re message isn’t memorable, then what was the point?

What’s your process for pulling a talk and accompanying slides together?

After I complete my AIM analysis, I think about the hook or the one or two stories I will weave throughout the presentation.

For instance, even if you’re going to be presenting a quarterly progress report, think about how much more fun – and therefore memorable – for your audience if you open with a personal or relatable story.

Like, you can’t believe you dinged your car over the weekend and how different the three estimates from three different mechanics were.  Then you segue from that – to the different projections your company heard from various investors – or something like that.

Then at the close of your numbers report, you refer back to you opening anecdote and reveal to your audience how much your car repair is going to cost and which garage you chose. Or that you just bought a new car? Or something.  This is called “the donut” approach to writing, and a simple, but useful device to retain your audience throughout a presentation.

People start to listen more and connect more because they can relate to the personal hook. Plus they’re shocked you’re not just jumping in with the typical “blah blah numbers, numbers.”

How did you first find out about Haiku Deck? 

Great question. I found PowerPoint extremely difficult to use.   There were too many choices and I was going bonkers trying to make my slides look professional.

I’m no graphics designer, but I knew that my arial font on a generic template looked icky.  Everything was looking too ‘PowerPointy.’ Exasperated, I Googled “Alternative Presentation Platforms” and Eureka!

I’ve been Haiku Deck Pro going on three years now and have created nearly a hundred unique decks.  I love it.

What reaction do you get from your audience when you speak at a conference or address a group? Do people notice your slides? 

I am always noticed as one who stands out from the norm.  The upbeat, fresh style of Haiku Deck matches my delivery style.

While I now have a graphics team I can farm things out to, I still make my own presentations because I don’t have to wait for the team to turn something around or try to imagine what look I’m going for. I can do it on my own more speedily – and still look like a graphics team did it!

The professional look combined with ease of use make Haiku Deck a game changer for me – and my clients.

How would you describe Haiku Deck to your clients?

I recommend Haiku Deck to all my clients. I tell them it’s super-easy to use and they will shake up their next employee or investor meeting or whatever  in a way that is extremely positive.  Every client who has tried Haiku Deck has thanked me.

What advice can you offer to Haiku Deck’s community as they think about their next public speaking engagement?

If you have taken the time to create a beautiful slide deck with Haiku Deck, you owe it to your audience to deliver in the same way. Practice out loud. Get off script. Tell stories to personally connect.  Have fun!  And get presentation coaching. Connect with me! Okay, I know. Shameless self promotion.

In short, Haiku Deck helps you “be the movie, not the book” – and that’s what all audiences hope they’ll receive when they sit down for a presentation.

Thanks, Gina, for taking the time to share your wisdom with our community! To learn more about using Haiku Deck to create expert presentations, visit or download our free iOS app from the iTunes app store.

Nonprofit Community Outreach Presentations: Guest Q&A with ADAO co-founder Linda Reinstein

I recently had the opportunity to speak with Linda Reinstein, co-founder of the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), who I knew as a long time Haiku Deck Pro Subscriber and fan.

From her website, I learned that Linda became an activist after her husband, Alan, was diagnosed with mesothelioma, an asbestos-related disease. What I did not know was that as a co-founder of ADAO, she frequently serves as a U.S. Congressional witness and had presented and delivered keynote speeches to the U.S. Senate, U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Department of Labor (OSHA), the White House, U.S. Surgeon General, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the United Nations.

Linda has frequently used Haiku Deck to inspire action, grow support, and rally a community around ADAO’s mission. Here’s what she had to say:

What advice do you have for nonprofits when it comes to sharing their story and inspiring their communities?

When I speak at a congressional hearing, about asbestos being legal and lethal today, I only have 5 minutes to make sure our collective story is seen, felt, and heard. When you have 5 minutes of your Senators time, when you have 5 minutes to sell a product, or to change public policy – you need to be clear and consistent. You realize pretty soon that short is better. I’ve forced myself to be clear, concise and consistent when I tell my story.

How can I, as a public health advocate, make you feel what I have lived through? How can you share what I know? How will you remember my presentation tomorrow?

I want people to remember the message and the way our stories made them feel. That’s how we will get lawmakers to understand and take action to ban asbestos.

With a subject like mesothelioma, and having complicated talking points, it is very hard to give a 45 minute talk/keynote and keep the audience engaged. With presentations – less is more. With Haiku Deck, I can show them images that are tongue-in-cheek funny, I keep the slides simple, and the audience finds it easy to focus on what it is I’m actually saying. The graphic interface is very important.

Here’s one of our favorite presentations from Linda, on the politics surrounding asbestos and its effects.

MONEY, POWER, AND POLITICS – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

What are some tips you offer to nonprofits for using technology to better market their organizations?

I keep telling people, ‘communication is not like the movie Field of Dreams. You can’t build your nonprofit and expect people will come’.

21st century activism has changed from traditional to digital – activism today is very social. We did a Twitter chat recently, and it was bilingual. We had people from US, Columbia and the UK participate. Someone was not able to get English, but they could connect with the graphic image in the background of the slide. Haiku slides can make it into a Twitter chat, into a blog post, and Instagram. The shareability is great – I can very quickly make decks and share to a global audience.

Because of changes in technology, access to technology and platforms, I’ve been able to access Haiku Deck in Australia, Hong Kong, in short – all over the world.

What inspired you to first start using Haiku Deck?

Three problems led me to Haiku Deck:

  1. Nonprofits have limited resources – time and financial
  2. When I convey a message to the audience, I want it to resonate not only in the moment, but in perpetuity
  3. I want my decks to look professional

I came across Haiku Deck while I was researching the book Presentation Zen, and I realized that Haiku Deck met most of the criteria. I’ve been a customer since 2014.

Can you think of a time Haiku Deck made a difference for you?

Once I was at a conference where I was sharing the stage with another presenter, each of us supposed to present for 30 minutes each. On the day of the conference, I was informed that the other speaker had cancelled, and that I was to present for another 30 minutes to make up for it. With such short notice, I had no time to write up a 30 minute speech. But, I did have 15 minutes to myself, when I sat down and made 20 Haiku Deck slides. I could move the slides around to structure my talk better, and this helped me arrange my thoughts and made my thoughts clear. After I went on stage, at the end of the day, I got great reviews. And I didn’t have the heart to tell them that I made the presentation in less than 15 minutes.

As a national and international speaker, I have spent hours doing elaborate slides on other software, but I get a better response from the audience when I use 1 title, 1 picture, and possibly 3-5 descriptive words – Haiku deck style. This helps bring the audience’s attention to the point I’m trying to make. As a digital storyteller, if I didn’t connect and engage effectively, I have lost the person forever, so I have to have my message be impactful.

It is important to not read your slides. With Haiku Deck’s templates, I don’t have too much text on my slides that tempts me to read it out. Instead, Haiku Deck – because of the simple styles – encourages the speaker to be prepared. Essentially, I, the speaker, have become stronger, clearer and more concise. I’ve found that not only can I deliver the message better, but that the audience also values it more.

If you had to sum up the benefits of Haiku Deck for nonprofits, what would you say?

Haiku Deck is quick, professional, impactful and well-priced. The styles/themes are great, and I can download and edit my slides…  I can very quickly make decks and share to a global audience. If then asked to do a presentation online, I use Haiku Deck, because of the simple interface.


Thank you Linda for sharing your experience with us! To learn more about her work,  follow Linda Reinstein on Twitter and visit her website. To view more of Linda’s Haiku Decks, visit her Haiku Deck user profile page.


Do you use Haiku Deck in your nonprofit? Email us your story!
Don’t currently use Haiku Deck with your nonprofit? Send us an e-mail to get set up.
(Did we mention that we offer a 50% nonprofit discount to new users?)


8 Teacher Presentations for Winning Back to School

For many teachers in our neck of the woods it’s already time to start thinking about back to school. So much to do! So much to say! So many presentations to make! As you think about how to introduce yourself, break the ice with your students, jumpstart your curriculum, lay the groundwork for your class, and meet the parents, we’re thinking more than a couple of teacher presentations may be in order. Lucky for you, Haiku Deck is here to help! Not only do we offer qualifying educators and students 50% off via our education discount, but here are 8 teacher presentations for winning at Back to School:

  1. Make a deck to introduce yourself to students, parents, and colleagues. We love this one from teacher Mindi Vandagriff.

Who is Mindi Vandagriff? – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Have your students create a Haiku Deck to share their summer adventures. Here’s an example that educator Shannon Lewis made to inspire her students to make their own.

What I Did This Summer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

3. Create a Haiku Deck to introduce your curriculum, weekly schedule, or to share announcements. Staci Ballard made this deck to orient her students on the first day of class.

Ballard UNIV prezo – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

4. Collaborate with students on a class constitution or agreement. We were particularly inspired by this one from Susan Hennessey. 

Our Classroom Constitution – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

5. Use the Haiku Deck Curriculum Night Presentation Template to get a head start on a professional-looking presentation to “wow” the parents. To copy/edit/remix this presentation, just click the link above and look for the ‘copy’ button beneath the slides on the playback page. 

Curriculum Night Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

6. Incorporate Haiku Deck into student-led conferences. Many teachers have  students create their student-led conference guides using Haiku Deck. We’re not going to share any examples of that here, but the presentation below from Kathryn Hogg aims to inspire and prepare her class in advance of student-led conferences. 

Student Led Conferences – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

7. Create your own educational manifesto. This one from Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie has racked up over 20,000 views since he first shared it online in 2013. 

The New Mind Set – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

8. Inspire your class with a Haiku Deck biography or quote collection like this one from Anna Stirling. You can even download as a .pdf file and print out the presentation to decorate your classroom.

Inspirational Quotes – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

How are you winning at Back to School with Haiku Deck teacher presentations? Drop us a line so we can share yours in the featured gallery! Just send a link to Hungry for more educator resources? Remember to visit our Education page at


4 Presentation Tips for your next Fundraiser

When you think about fundraising, do you find yourself dreading the presentation more than the fundraising itself? Do you find yourself spending more time fixing the font, the text, and the clipart rather than working on the actual content of your slides or practicing your pitch?

With thousands of nonprofits turning to Haiku Deck for help in creating their fundraising presentations, we’ve come up with 4 key principles that can help your fundraising presentation be more effective.

  1. One Idea per Slide

Your audience can not read text-heavy slides and listen to your words at the same time. Presentation and fundraising experts agree that minimizing the information on each slide, helps the audience focus on the narrative.

“Presenters often use [their slides] as a support for themselves. The effect is that they use a lot of text on the slides, which is detrimental to the information-processing by the audience,” says Brigitte Hertz1, author of the research paper ‘PowerPoint Slides as Speaking Notes.’ Text-heavy slides actually make speakers more nervous about their presentations.”

International leadership coach and fundraising trainer Marc A. Pitman says, ‘I’m increasingly becoming a fan of using one image on a slide… The results have been extraordinary. My audiences used to get a glazed-over information overload look; now they’re leaving my talks energized and seem to be getting much more from them.’2

2. Have a conversation

Don’t let your audience be passive for too long during your presentation. Start your pitch with a question that gets them thinking. Ask for a raise of hands often as you walk through the presentation.

Ask the audience questions and get them to make bets about what they think is right before giving them an answer. At the end of the talk, repeat the main points, but encourage the audience to summarize it for themselves. When people explain key points back to themselves, they learn much better than when they just hear it,’ says Art Markman3, Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin.

No matter how short your time on stage is, the best outcome for you is when the audience remember you long after they’ve gone home.

3. Share a story

While it is important to share information about your organization and related data, keep in mind that your donors are going to have a hard time remembering most of it after your presentation is over.

‘As a general rule, people are not very interested in talks about organizations or institutions (unless they’re members of them). Ideas and stories fascinate us; organizations bore us—they’re much harder to relate to,’ says Chris Anderson4, curator of TED. ‘Don’t boast about your company; rather, tell us about the problem you’re solving.’

Listeners will remember and act upon stories that bring emotion and humanity to the organization’s work. 

4. Research your big donors

Think back to the thank you letters that you’ve received, and the ones that you remember. How was it that you remember only a handful of letters? Chances are that those were the ones that reminded you of a personal experience you’ve had.

‘Identify who your audience is and what their connection is, or might be, to your story. That way, you can focus on what words and images will resonate with them, rather than what works for you,’ says Alice Ferris, founder of GoalBusters, a consultancy that helps small to mid-size nonprofit organizations.

Research your donors prior to your fundraiser (without being too creepy) and come up with a hypothesis on why they’re interested in helping your cause. Have they donated to similar causes in the past? Addressing this during your pitch will help you stand out from other similar fundraisers that your donors might attend.

Interested in learning more? Take a look at other nonprofit presentations at

Did we mention that we offer a 50% nonprofit discount? Send us an e-mail at to get set up.


1 Here’s Why No One Is Paying Attention to Your PowerPoint Presentation by Martha C. White

2 Fundraising Secret #37: Use Powerpoint effectively by Marc A. Pitman

3 Getting an Audience to Remember Your Presentation by Art Markman

4 How to Give a Killer Presentation by Chris Anderson

10 Tips for Nailing Your Next Conference Presentation

We understand that making a presentation for a big meeting or conference can be more than a little anxiety provoking- that’s often why people turn to Haiku Deck in the first place. Regardless of the software you choose, we’ve combed our creative community to find best practices from conference keynote speakers, meeting organizers, speech writers, and others… All as part of mission to make presentations 10x faster and easier. Hopefully we can make them 10x less nerve wracking too. From figuring out what you’re going to say, to designing your presentation, to delivering your talk, these tips and tricks are just what you need make the most of your next conference presentation.

10 Tips for Nailing Your Conference Presentation – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

  1. Consider your audience first. Too often, speakers start by asking, “What do I want to say?” Instead, experts recommend that you think about what your audience hopes to get from your presentation. Even when you’ve got your own important agenda , putting your audience first it will help you frame the message to better connect and have greater impact.
  2. Create an outline. Organizing your ideas in an outline before you get down to presentation creation is a great way to save time. Not only do outlines force you to get your thoughts organized, but this way you avoid the distraction of formatting and image selection before it’s time. Think about the one important thing that you want your audience to remember at the end of your talk. Try to organize around this theme and build your outline to support your big idea. Of course, once you have your outline, you’re welcome to use Haiku Deck Zuru to convert your outline into a deck. Most of the time, Haiku Deck Zuru will get you 50-80% of the way from outline to presentation in just a few minutes.
  3. Boil it Down… 1 idea at a time: Perhaps the biggest mistake conference speakers make is trying to share too much all at once. Remember: Even the most important and interesting information has to be shared at a pace that the audience can absorb. Think of your slides as billboards on the side of the highway. They should include few words that reinforce the ideas that you’re sharing. If your slides have too many words, your audience will have to choose between either reading what’s on the screen or listening to you. Our brains cannot read detailed information on a slide and listen at the same time, so try not to force your audience to make this choice.
  4. Choose evocative images: The research shows that people remember pictures better than words. When your slides include evocative images that illustrate your idea, it creates a tool that your listeners can fall back on for remembering what you said.  That’s why beautiful imagery is at the center of Haiku Deck presentations and why we recommend choosing a mix of images to stimulate your audience and deliver impact.
  5. Tell a story: More than anything, Listeners remember how you make them feel during a presentation. That’s because humans are hardwired to engage with and remember stories more than other information. Creating an emotional connection between your idea through a well told story is the number one way to make your conference presentation more powerful. If you can illustrate your story with relevant imagery or a physical artifact, all the better.
  6. Engage your audience: One great way to engage an audience or to reengage an audience in the middle of your talk is to ask a question or encourage audience participation. Talking with your audience helps to draw them in and breaks the pace of a talk, even if just asking for a “quick show of hands” can make a difference. Encouraging the audience to ask questions or discuss via social channels like Twitter can also be a good way to extend the reach of your ideas beyond the room where you’re speaking.
  7. Think about transitions between topics: Even the best outlines can have some rough transitions as you move from one part of your talk to the next. The best way to handle these transitions is to practice them in advance. We also recommend thinking the use of stories and audience engagement as tools for moving the audience from one part of your presentation to the next.
  8. Remember the Golden Rule: Do you like listening to someone read off their slides word-for-word? Neither do we.. Same goes for tiny font, mismatched colors, obnoxious animations, and horrible clip art. If you’re using Haiku Deck, we know you’re not doing this, but just in case you’re new here, please do your audience a favor and treat them the way you wish to be treated when you’re the listener.
  9. Craft a strong finish with an inspiring call to action: If your speech ends with, “…and that’s all I’ve got, any questions?” then you’re doing it wrong. In addition to summarizing your big idea as a reminder to listeners, think about ending your talk with a provocative question or call to action. Inspire your audience with a solution that can be achieved with their participation.
  10. Share your deck  through social media: To get the most from your hard work, be sure to share your deck through Twitter, Facebook, email, and any other channel you can. To maximize the reach, remember to include the event hashtag to achieve maximum visibility for your work.

Of course, we would be remiss if we didn’t share with your our Killer Speech template, embedded below, which anyone can open, copy, and edit as their own.

Killer Speech Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Conference Presentation Tips for attendees, speakers, and organizers

If you’re speaking at conferences or events this season, we know conference presentations are never easy. Your audience will thank you for using Haiku Deck to simplify your message. But even if you’re not the one taking the stage as a keynote speaker, there are tons of ways to make the most of a conference experience using Haiku Deck to learn, spread ideas and build your network.

As we look forward to this month’s I.S.T.E. conference (see you there?), we wanted to share some tips and tricks to help conference presenters and even regular conference attendees make the most of the experience.

Before the Event

Haiku Deck is a great way to drive awareness and excitement for a conference ahead of time. You can easily embed Haiku Decks in your blog or website and share them on social channels. Don’t forget to use the event’s hashtag! Here’s a Haiku Deck we made to build buzz for the ISTE2017 conference:

ISTE 2017 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Tips and best practices:

More “before the event” Haiku Decks:

During the Event

You can also use Haiku Deck as a fun and unique idea-sharing tool, to capture quotable gems and circulate them with your networks.

You can create a Haiku Deck recap of a particular talk, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Wendy Townley at the ALT Summit:

Alt Summit SLC 2013: Personal Branding – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
Another approach is to create a “highlights” Haiku Deck, with sound bites from a wide range of speakers. Here’s an example we made while sitting in the audience at the XConomy Mobile Madness Northwest Forum:

XConomy Forum Sound Bites – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Tips and best practices:

  • Consider creating the first few slides of your deck to set context in advance, so you can give the speaker(s) your full attention.
  • If there’s an event hashtag, keep an eye out for photos attendees have taken that you can incorporate into your deck, or sound bites you might have missed. (Bonus: Tweets are usually short enough to fit on a Haik Deck slide.)
  • You can even make a Haiku Deck of sound bites if you’re following along virtually, via Twitter and an event hashtag–I created this one, of the closing keynote at IntegratED PDX, on the train since I couldn’t be in the room during the talk.

More “during the event” Haiku Decks:

Post-Event Haiku Decks

There’s no better way to share what you’ve learned, key observations, trends, or things that inspired you than with a Haiku Deck wrap-up for your colleagues who couldn’t attend. As you review your notes, you can build a deck that captures your experience, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie:

How to Enrich Conferences and Events with Haiku Deck

Click to view the full Haiku Deck with notes

Tips and best practices:

More “After the Event” Haiku Decks:

The Main Event

Of course, if you are up on stage, and you are using Haiku Deck for your slides (Hai-5!), don’t forget to share them with the event attendees using the social share and embed buttons–and with us! Send a link to your deck to, and we’ll consider them for our Featured or Popular Gallery.

Add audio and Create a Presentation Video in Haiku Deck

More and more presentations are being shared in virtual spaces- from webinars and blogs to social media and online forums. As a result, our top feature request has been to let users add audio to their Haiku Deck presentations and give the option of saving presentations with audio as video presentations. With the launch of new Haiku Deck Presentation Video beta, we are delivering on this request.

Our test-release will be available for a limited time at no additional charge to Haiku Deck Pro Subscribers via our web site only.

What better way to introduce you to Haiku Deck Presentation videos than with a Presentation Video about this very topic.  (I know, it’s meta)

While Presentation Videos will be offered at no-additional charge during the beta period, we do expect that it will eventually be paid upgrade for Haiku Deck Pro users.

We came to Presentation Videos based on feedback from thousands of users who told us they need a better way to create all kinds of videos. Here are a few examples of the requests:

  1. Create videos for webinars
  2. Create videos for corporate training
  3. Quickly create and deliver lesson videos for students in flipped classrooms or traditional learning environments
  4. Create team update videos
  5. Reach more customers online with remote sales presentation videos
  6. Inspire donors and share your story with fundraising videos for nonprofits and other organizations
  7. Keep your group engaged with community update videos
  8. Easily build promotional videos for events, products, and services
  9. Drive listeners and readers to your blog and podcast by creating presentation videos that summarize your content for easy sharing through social media
  10. Create informational videos for customers and partners

As with any beta, some users may encounter an issue along the way. Please share any problems you encounter or ideas you have so we can make Haiku Deck Presentation Videos the best possible solution for your needs.

For more information about creating Presentation Videos in Haiku Deck, please refer to the Haiku Deck User Guide and our FAQ.

Audio Playback for Haiku Deck Presentations

In addition to creating videos, we also now support audio playback through the Haiku Deck playback pages. When you record your audio, a small play button will appear in the lower left corner of your slides. Online viewers can click to hear your audio track for each slide. For more information on adding audio to your Haiku Deck, please refer to this article on the Haiku Deck User Guide. For information on audio playback, please refer to this article.


8 Ways Presentations Grow Nonprofits

Over the past few years we’ve heard from thousands who use Haiku Deck in their nonprofit organization to create great presentations for engaging donors, rallying volunteers, training teams, and promoting their mission. Here are eight ways we’ve seen Haiku Deck help grow nonprofits around the world.

1. Personalize Your Mission:

Every nonprofit is inspired by a story. Many can be quite powerful, such as the story that inspired In the presentation below, they use personal stories and personal examples to bring their mission to life.

A True Gift of Love – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Make a memorable impression:

Images help potential donors visualize impact, as most people remember an average of 10% of what they read, and 65% of the visuals they see. Using powerful images is one way to make a strong impression that drives to action.

Hurricane Sandy: How You Can Help – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

3. Grow Awareness:

The best decks are featured on our website and in blog posts like this one, attracting thousands of views and shares. Here is a deck that has received nearly 17,000 views from one of our users highlighting volunteers in the “Calais Jungle,” a congregation of homeless peoples’ tents in France.

The ordinary people who volunteer in the Calais Jungle – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

4. Training Volunteers:

Many organizations struggle to deliver effective training materials for volunteers. Haiku Deck, makes it easy to deliver the information your growing team needs to succeed.

Surviving At Carewell – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

5. Pitching Partners and Investors

When it comes to scaling your organization, finding partners and investors can be a critical success factor. The Diversity Fund’s Haiku Deck below is a great example of just such a pitch deck.

Diversity Fund – Finance for the rest of us! – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

6. Attract Sponsors:

Private-sector sponsors want to know that your organization shares their appreciation for professional design. This starts with a presentation that looks professional. Here’s a creative sponsorship proposal for an organization supporting programs for at-risk youth.

Best 5k Sponsorship Offer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
7. Update Donors:

A well informed donor is more likely to become a repeat donor. Haiku Deck is a great way to keep your supporters up to date on the progress you’re making. 
The Money House Update – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

8. Use Social Media To Drive Viral Awareness For Your Cause:

Aside from sharing your presentations in person, Haiku Decks are easily shared through Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other social channels. Creating visual content for your social networks with Haiku Deck keeps your community engaged and helps them to spread the word about your mission.

Anything we missed?

Let us know if you have any other creative ways to use Haiku Decks to grow nonprofits! E-mail us decks and creative ideas at for a chance to have your ideas quoted and decks featured in our upcoming nonprofit landing page!

Join us!

Did we mention that we offer a 50% nonprofit discount for eligible organizations?

From Wikipedia article to Presentation in 5 minutes flat

With more than 5,000,000 articles, Wikipedia is a gold-mine for information that presenters can use to build or enrich presentations on virtually any topic. For this reason, we’re excited to share that Haiku Deck Zuru makes the process of converting a Wikipedia topic to a presentation significantly faster and easier than ever before.

The simple process is shown in this video and below.

  1. CHOOSE YOUR TOPIC: Start by clicking the Zuru button and choosing Wikipedia topic as your starting point.  Next, type your topic. As you type, Zuru will show you relevant topics already available on Wikipedia. Use the slider bar to choose the desired length for your presentation. The fewer slides, the tighter the summarization will be in the next step. 
  2. EDIT YOUR OUTLINE: In step 3 you’ll be presented with an outline of the Wikipedia article. Here you can open a new window with the Wikipedia source material and edit the outline as needed. In some cases the Zuru summarization will be exactly what you want. In other cases, you’ll want to add and remove elements of the outline to suit your needs.
  3. CHOOSE IMAGES: After you’re done with the Wikipedia presentation outline, Zuru will extract image keywords for each slide in the outline. You can choose one of the suggested image tags, enter your own image search term, or just choose a solid color background. Repeat this process for each slide.
  4. PREVIEW SLIDES: When you’ve finished step 4 for each of your slides, Zuru will carefully review the image selections to choose the right layout and color palette for the fonts and text background. The result is a rough draft of your presentation shown in preview mode. Clicking edit beneath slide thumbnail will take you back step 3 above.  Click the blue EDIT DECK button to edit the deck in the Haiku Deck Editor. Click the blue DOWNLOAD button to download in .pptx or .pdf format.
  5. EDIT/DOWNLOAD: If you are a paying Haiku Deck Pro subscriber, your next step is to edit the deck in the Haiku Deck editor or download your draft in PowerPoint or .pdf formats. If you are not signed in as a paying Haiku Deck Pro subscriber, you will have the option of subscribing or paying a one-time fee to complete this step.

We’d love to hear what you think of Zuru! Please share your feedback with us here.

Storytelling for Brand Building & Marketing

I recently had the pleasure of joining Kelly Lucente, CEO & Brand Strategist of Minneapolis-based Re-Tool Marketing for an in-depth conversation covering a range of topics from how Haiku Deck came to be, to finding and living your passion, to the principles of great presentation creation, how we built the Haiku Deck brand, and more.

Re-Tool Marketing helps clients build strong brands through powerful strategy, identity, and positioning. Aside from being one of the best in the branding business, Kelly has been a long-time Haiku Deck Pro member and enthusiastic evangelist for our approach to presentations. If you’re passionate about brand-building and marketing or if you’re curious to learn some of the background that led us to Haiku Deck, this is for you!

To learn more about Re-Tool Marketing, be sure to head over to their web site, where you’ll some other helpful videos about brand building

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