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8 Teacher Presentations for Winning Back to School

For many teachers in our neck of the woods it’s already time to start thinking about back to school. So much to do! So much to say! So many presentations to make! As you think about how to introduce yourself, break the ice with your students, jumpstart your curriculum, lay the groundwork for your class, and meet the parents, we’re thinking more than a couple of teacher presentations may be in order. Lucky for you, Haiku Deck is here to help! Not only do we offer qualifying educators and students 50% off via our education discount, but here are 8 teacher presentations for winning at Back to School:

  1. Make a deck to introduce yourself to students, parents, and colleagues. We love this one from teacher Mindi Vandagriff.


Who is Mindi Vandagriff? – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Have your students create a Haiku Deck to share their summer adventures. Here’s an example that educator Shannon Lewis made to inspire her students to make their own.


What I Did This Summer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

3. Create a Haiku Deck to introduce your curriculum, weekly schedule, or to share announcements. Staci Ballard made this deck to orient her students on the first day of class.


Ballard UNIV prezo – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

4. Collaborate with students on a class constitution or agreement. We were particularly inspired by this one from Susan Hennessey. 

Our Classroom Constitution – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

5. Use the Haiku Deck Curriculum Night Presentation Template to get a head start on a professional-looking presentation to “wow” the parents. To copy/edit/remix this presentation, just click the link above and look for the ‘copy’ button beneath the slides on the playback page. 

Curriculum Night Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

6. Incorporate Haiku Deck into student-led conferences. Many teachers have  students create their student-led conference guides using Haiku Deck. We’re not going to share any examples of that here, but the presentation below from Kathryn Hogg aims to inspire and prepare her class in advance of student-led conferences. 

Student Led Conferences – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

7. Create your own educational manifesto. This one from Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie has racked up over 20,000 views since he first shared it online in 2013. 

The New Mind Set – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

8. Inspire your class with a Haiku Deck biography or quote collection like this one from Anna Stirling. You can even download as a .pdf file and print out the presentation to decorate your classroom.

Inspirational Quotes – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

How are you winning at Back to School with Haiku Deck teacher presentations? Drop us a line so we can share yours in the featured gallery! Just send a link to team@haikudeck.com. Hungry for more educator resources? Remember to visit our Education page at www.haikudeck.com/education.

 

4 Presentation Tips for your next Fundraiser

When you think about fundraising, do you find yourself dreading the presentation more than the fundraising itself? Do you find yourself spending more time fixing the font, the text, and the clipart rather than working on the actual content of your slides or practicing your pitch?

With thousands of nonprofits turning to Haiku Deck for help in creating their fundraising presentations, we’ve come up with 4 key principles that can help your fundraising presentation be more effective.

  1. One Idea per Slide

Your audience can not read text-heavy slides and listen to your words at the same time. Presentation and fundraising experts agree that minimizing the information on each slide, helps the audience focus on the narrative.

“Presenters often use [their slides] as a support for themselves. The effect is that they use a lot of text on the slides, which is detrimental to the information-processing by the audience,” says Brigitte Hertz1, author of the research paper ‘PowerPoint Slides as Speaking Notes.’ Text-heavy slides actually make speakers more nervous about their presentations.”

International leadership coach and fundraising trainer Marc A. Pitman says, ‘I’m increasingly becoming a fan of using one image on a slide… The results have been extraordinary. My audiences used to get a glazed-over information overload look; now they’re leaving my talks energized and seem to be getting much more from them.’2

2. Have a conversation

Don’t let your audience be passive for too long during your presentation. Start your pitch with a question that gets them thinking. Ask for a raise of hands often as you walk through the presentation.

Ask the audience questions and get them to make bets about what they think is right before giving them an answer. At the end of the talk, repeat the main points, but encourage the audience to summarize it for themselves. When people explain key points back to themselves, they learn much better than when they just hear it,’ says Art Markman3, Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin.

No matter how short your time on stage is, the best outcome for you is when the audience remember you long after they’ve gone home.

3. Share a story

While it is important to share information about your organization and related data, keep in mind that your donors are going to have a hard time remembering most of it after your presentation is over.

‘As a general rule, people are not very interested in talks about organizations or institutions (unless they’re members of them). Ideas and stories fascinate us; organizations bore us—they’re much harder to relate to,’ says Chris Anderson4, curator of TED. ‘Don’t boast about your company; rather, tell us about the problem you’re solving.’

Listeners will remember and act upon stories that bring emotion and humanity to the organization’s work. 

4. Research your big donors

Think back to the thank you letters that you’ve received, and the ones that you remember. How was it that you remember only a handful of letters? Chances are that those were the ones that reminded you of a personal experience you’ve had.

‘Identify who your audience is and what their connection is, or might be, to your story. That way, you can focus on what words and images will resonate with them, rather than what works for you,’ says Alice Ferris, founder of GoalBusters, a consultancy that helps small to mid-size nonprofit organizations.

Research your donors prior to your fundraiser (without being too creepy) and come up with a hypothesis on why they’re interested in helping your cause. Have they donated to similar causes in the past? Addressing this during your pitch will help you stand out from other similar fundraisers that your donors might attend.

Interested in learning more? Take a look at other nonprofit presentations at www.bit.ly/hdnpo

Did we mention that we offer a 50% nonprofit discount? Send us an e-mail at nonprofit@haikudeck.com to get set up.

References:

1 Here’s Why No One Is Paying Attention to Your PowerPoint Presentation by Martha C. White

2 Fundraising Secret #37: Use Powerpoint effectively by Marc A. Pitman

3 Getting an Audience to Remember Your Presentation by Art Markman

4 How to Give a Killer Presentation by Chris Anderson

10 Tips for Nailing Your Next Conference Presentation

We understand that making a presentation for a big meeting or conference can be more than a little anxiety provoking- that’s often why people turn to Haiku Deck in the first place. Regardless of the software you choose, we’ve combed our creative community to find best practices from conference keynote speakers, meeting organizers, speech writers, and others… All as part of mission to make presentations 10x faster and easier. Hopefully we can make them 10x less nerve wracking too. From figuring out what you’re going to say, to designing your presentation, to delivering your talk, these tips and tricks are just what you need make the most of your next conference presentation.


10 Tips for Nailing Your Conference Presentation – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

  1. Consider your audience first. Too often, speakers start by asking, “What do I want to say?” Instead, experts recommend that you think about what your audience hopes to get from your presentation. Even when you’ve got your own important agenda , putting your audience first it will help you frame the message to better connect and have greater impact.
  2. Create an outline. Organizing your ideas in an outline before you get down to presentation creation is a great way to save time. Not only do outlines force you to get your thoughts organized, but this way you avoid the distraction of formatting and image selection before it’s time. Think about the one important thing that you want your audience to remember at the end of your talk. Try to organize around this theme and build your outline to support your big idea. Of course, once you have your outline, you’re welcome to use Haiku Deck Zuru to convert your outline into a deck. Most of the time, Haiku Deck Zuru will get you 50-80% of the way from outline to presentation in just a few minutes.
  3. Boil it Down… 1 idea at a time: Perhaps the biggest mistake conference speakers make is trying to share too much all at once. Remember: Even the most important and interesting information has to be shared at a pace that the audience can absorb. Think of your slides as billboards on the side of the highway. They should include few words that reinforce the ideas that you’re sharing. If your slides have too many words, your audience will have to choose between either reading what’s on the screen or listening to you. Our brains cannot read detailed information on a slide and listen at the same time, so try not to force your audience to make this choice.
  4. Choose evocative images: The research shows that people remember pictures better than words. When your slides include evocative images that illustrate your idea, it creates a tool that your listeners can fall back on for remembering what you said.  That’s why beautiful imagery is at the center of Haiku Deck presentations and why we recommend choosing a mix of images to stimulate your audience and deliver impact.
  5. Tell a story: More than anything, Listeners remember how you make them feel during a presentation. That’s because humans are hardwired to engage with and remember stories more than other information. Creating an emotional connection between your idea through a well told story is the number one way to make your conference presentation more powerful. If you can illustrate your story with relevant imagery or a physical artifact, all the better.
  6. Engage your audience: One great way to engage an audience or to reengage an audience in the middle of your talk is to ask a question or encourage audience participation. Talking with your audience helps to draw them in and breaks the pace of a talk, even if just asking for a “quick show of hands” can make a difference. Encouraging the audience to ask questions or discuss via social channels like Twitter can also be a good way to extend the reach of your ideas beyond the room where you’re speaking.
  7. Think about transitions between topics: Even the best outlines can have some rough transitions as you move from one part of your talk to the next. The best way to handle these transitions is to practice them in advance. We also recommend thinking the use of stories and audience engagement as tools for moving the audience from one part of your presentation to the next.
  8. Remember the Golden Rule: Do you like listening to someone read off their slides word-for-word? Neither do we.. Same goes for tiny font, mismatched colors, obnoxious animations, and horrible clip art. If you’re using Haiku Deck, we know you’re not doing this, but just in case you’re new here, please do your audience a favor and treat them the way you wish to be treated when you’re the listener.
  9. Craft a strong finish with an inspiring call to action: If your speech ends with, “…and that’s all I’ve got, any questions?” then you’re doing it wrong. In addition to summarizing your big idea as a reminder to listeners, think about ending your talk with a provocative question or call to action. Inspire your audience with a solution that can be achieved with their participation.
  10. Share your deck  through social media: To get the most from your hard work, be sure to share your deck through Twitter, Facebook, email, and any other channel you can. To maximize the reach, remember to include the event hashtag to achieve maximum visibility for your work.

Of course, we would be remiss if we didn’t share with your our Killer Speech template, embedded below, which anyone can open, copy, and edit as their own.


Killer Speech Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Conference Presentation Tips for attendees, speakers, and organizers

If you’re speaking at conferences or events this season, we know conference presentations are never easy. Your audience will thank you for using Haiku Deck to simplify your message. But even if you’re not the one taking the stage as a keynote speaker, there are tons of ways to make the most of a conference experience using Haiku Deck to learn, spread ideas and build your network.

As we look forward to this month’s I.S.T.E. conference (see you there?), we wanted to share some tips and tricks to help conference presenters and even regular conference attendees make the most of the experience.

Before the Event

Haiku Deck is a great way to drive awareness and excitement for a conference ahead of time. You can easily embed Haiku Decks in your blog or website and share them on social channels. Don’t forget to use the event’s hashtag! Here’s a Haiku Deck we made to build buzz for the ISTE2017 conference:


ISTE 2017 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Tips and best practices:

More “before the event” Haiku Decks:

During the Event

You can also use Haiku Deck as a fun and unique idea-sharing tool, to capture quotable gems and circulate them with your networks.

You can create a Haiku Deck recap of a particular talk, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Wendy Townley at the ALT Summit:


Alt Summit SLC 2013: Personal Branding – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
Another approach is to create a “highlights” Haiku Deck, with sound bites from a wide range of speakers. Here’s an example we made while sitting in the audience at the XConomy Mobile Madness Northwest Forum:


XConomy Forum Sound Bites – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Tips and best practices:

  • Consider creating the first few slides of your deck to set context in advance, so you can give the speaker(s) your full attention.
  • If there’s an event hashtag, keep an eye out for photos attendees have taken that you can incorporate into your deck, or sound bites you might have missed. (Bonus: Tweets are usually short enough to fit on a Haik Deck slide.)
  • You can even make a Haiku Deck of sound bites if you’re following along virtually, via Twitter and an event hashtag–I created this one, of the closing keynote at IntegratED PDX, on the train since I couldn’t be in the room during the talk.

More “during the event” Haiku Decks:

Post-Event Haiku Decks

There’s no better way to share what you’ve learned, key observations, trends, or things that inspired you than with a Haiku Deck wrap-up for your colleagues who couldn’t attend. As you review your notes, you can build a deck that captures your experience, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie:

How to Enrich Conferences and Events with Haiku Deck

Click to view the full Haiku Deck with notes

Tips and best practices:

More “After the Event” Haiku Decks:

The Main Event

Of course, if you are up on stage, and you are using Haiku Deck for your slides (Hai-5!), don’t forget to share them with the event attendees using the social share and embed buttons–and with us! Send a link to your deck to gallery@haikudeck.com, and we’ll consider them for our Featured or Popular Gallery.

Add audio and Create a Presentation Video in Haiku Deck

More and more presentations are being shared in virtual spaces- from webinars and blogs to social media and online forums. As a result, our top feature request has been to let users add audio to their Haiku Deck presentations and give the option of saving presentations with audio as video presentations. With the launch of new Haiku Deck Presentation Video beta, we are delivering on this request.

Our test-release will be available for a limited time at no additional charge to Haiku Deck Pro Subscribers via our web site only.

What better way to introduce you to Haiku Deck Presentation videos than with a Presentation Video about this very topic.  (I know, it’s meta)

While Presentation Videos will be offered at no-additional charge during the beta period, we do expect that it will eventually be paid upgrade for Haiku Deck Pro users.

We came to Presentation Videos based on feedback from thousands of users who told us they need a better way to create all kinds of videos. Here are a few examples of the requests:

  1. Create videos for webinars
  2. Create videos for corporate training
  3. Quickly create and deliver lesson videos for students in flipped classrooms or traditional learning environments
  4. Create team update videos
  5. Reach more customers online with remote sales presentation videos
  6. Inspire donors and share your story with fundraising videos for nonprofits and other organizations
  7. Keep your group engaged with community update videos
  8. Easily build promotional videos for events, products, and services
  9. Drive listeners and readers to your blog and podcast by creating presentation videos that summarize your content for easy sharing through social media
  10. Create informational videos for customers and partners

As with any beta, some users may encounter an issue along the way. Please share any problems you encounter or ideas you have so we can make Haiku Deck Presentation Videos the best possible solution for your needs.

For more information about creating Presentation Videos in Haiku Deck, please refer to the Haiku Deck User Guide and our FAQ.

Audio Playback for Haiku Deck Presentations

In addition to creating videos, we also now support audio playback through the Haiku Deck playback pages. When you record your audio, a small play button will appear in the lower left corner of your slides. Online viewers can click to hear your audio track for each slide. For more information on adding audio to your Haiku Deck, please refer to this article on the Haiku Deck User Guide. For information on audio playback, please refer to this article.

 

8 Ways Presentations Grow Nonprofits

Over the past few years we’ve heard from thousands who use Haiku Deck in their nonprofit organization to create great presentations for engaging donors, rallying volunteers, training teams, and promoting their mission. Here are eight ways we’ve seen Haiku Deck help grow nonprofits around the world.

1. Personalize Your Mission:

Every nonprofit is inspired by a story. Many can be quite powerful, such as the story that inspired alexashope.org. In the presentation below, they use personal stories and personal examples to bring their mission to life.

A True Gift of Love – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Make a memorable impression:

Images help potential donors visualize impact, as most people remember an average of 10% of what they read, and 65% of the visuals they see. Using powerful images is one way to make a strong impression that drives to action.


Hurricane Sandy: How You Can Help – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

3. Grow Awareness:

The best decks are featured on our website and in blog posts like this one, attracting thousands of views and shares. Here is a deck that has received nearly 17,000 views from one of our users highlighting volunteers in the “Calais Jungle,” a congregation of homeless peoples’ tents in France.


The ordinary people who volunteer in the Calais Jungle – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

4. Training Volunteers:

Many organizations struggle to deliver effective training materials for volunteers. Haiku Deck, makes it easy to deliver the information your growing team needs to succeed.


Surviving At Carewell – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

5. Pitching Partners and Investors

When it comes to scaling your organization, finding partners and investors can be a critical success factor. The Diversity Fund’s Haiku Deck below is a great example of just such a pitch deck.


Diversity Fund – Finance for the rest of us! – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

6. Attract Sponsors:

Private-sector sponsors want to know that your organization shares their appreciation for professional design. This starts with a presentation that looks professional. Here’s a creative sponsorship proposal for an organization supporting programs for at-risk youth.


Best 5k Sponsorship Offer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
7. Update Donors:

A well informed donor is more likely to become a repeat donor. Haiku Deck is a great way to keep your supporters up to date on the progress you’re making. 
The Money House Update – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

8. Use Social Media To Drive Viral Awareness For Your Cause:

Aside from sharing your presentations in person, Haiku Decks are easily shared through Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and other social channels. Creating visual content for your social networks with Haiku Deck keeps your community engaged and helps them to spread the word about your mission.


Charity & Social Media – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Anything we missed?

Let us know if you have any other creative ways to use Haiku Decks to grow nonprofits! E-mail us decks and creative ideas at gallery@haikudeck.com for a chance to have your ideas quoted and decks featured in our upcoming nonprofit landing page!

Join us!

Did we mention that we offer a 50% nonprofit discount?
Send us an e-mail at nonprofit@haikudeck.com to get set up.


From Wikipedia article to Presentation in 5 minutes flat

With more than 5,000,000 articles, Wikipedia is a gold-mine for information that presenters can use to build or enrich presentations on virtually any topic. For this reason, we’re excited to share that Haiku Deck Zuru makes the process of converting a Wikipedia topic to a presentation significantly faster and easier than ever before.

The simple process is shown in this video and below.

  1. CHOOSE YOUR TOPIC: Start by clicking the Zuru button and choosing Wikipedia topic as your starting point.  Next, type your topic. As you type, Zuru will show you relevant topics already available on Wikipedia. Use the slider bar to choose the desired length for your presentation. The fewer slides, the tighter the summarization will be in the next step. 
  2. EDIT YOUR OUTLINE: In step 3 you’ll be presented with an outline of the Wikipedia article. Here you can open a new window with the Wikipedia source material and edit the outline as needed. In some cases the Zuru summarization will be exactly what you want. In other cases, you’ll want to add and remove elements of the outline to suit your needs.
  3. CHOOSE IMAGES: After you’re done with the Wikipedia presentation outline, Zuru will extract image keywords for each slide in the outline. You can choose one of the suggested image tags, enter your own image search term, or just choose a solid color background. Repeat this process for each slide.
  4. PREVIEW SLIDES: When you’ve finished step 4 for each of your slides, Zuru will carefully review the image selections to choose the right layout and color palette for the fonts and text background. The result is a rough draft of your presentation shown in preview mode. Clicking edit beneath slide thumbnail will take you back step 3 above.  Click the blue EDIT DECK button to edit the deck in the Haiku Deck Editor. Click the blue DOWNLOAD button to download in .pptx or .pdf format.
  5. EDIT/DOWNLOAD: If you are a paying Haiku Deck Pro subscriber, your next step is to edit the deck in the Haiku Deck editor or download your draft in PowerPoint or .pdf formats. If you are not signed in as a paying Haiku Deck Pro subscriber, you will have the option of subscribing or paying a one-time fee to complete this step.

We’d love to hear what you think of Zuru! Please share your feedback with us here.

Storytelling for Brand Building & Marketing

I recently had the pleasure of joining Kelly Lucente, CEO & Brand Strategist of Minneapolis-based Re-Tool Marketing for an in-depth conversation covering a range of topics from how Haiku Deck came to be, to finding and living your passion, to the principles of great presentation creation, how we built the Haiku Deck brand, and more.

Re-Tool Marketing helps clients build strong brands through powerful strategy, identity, and positioning. Aside from being one of the best in the branding business, Kelly has been a long-time Haiku Deck Pro member and enthusiastic evangelist for our approach to presentations. If you’re passionate about brand-building and marketing or if you’re curious to learn some of the background that led us to Haiku Deck, this is for you!

To learn more about Re-Tool Marketing, be sure to head over to their web site, http://www.retoolmarketing.com/ where you’ll some other helpful videos about brand building

Find and Remix Presentations with Haiku Deck Gallery Search

Long time readers of our blog know that from the beginning, Haiku Deck’s vision has been to make it 10x faster to create  presentations that are 10x better. One way we’ve done this is through our apps on iOS and the web. Another way we’ve done this is through Haiku Deck Zuru, our Artificial Intelligence that automatically creates presentations from outlines, Wikipedia topics, or even existing .pptx files. We’ve also achieved this through our creative community who have shared millions of presentations with one another. Today we’re happy to announce  a brand-new feature that makes it easier than ever before to find and remix decks from the millions in our library of publicly shared presentations.

 

New Haiku Deck Gallery Search is available on the web only and it allows you to keyword search all publicly shared decks created in Haiku Deck. Keywords can include topic matter or author name. After running a search you can sort the results by relevance or date.

When you find a deck you want to save to your gallery or remix, first click through to that deck’s playback page. Then look for the COPY button beneath the slides. Learn more about copying decks in this article.

copy decks from playback

Decks not designated by the author as reuseable will not have a COPY button visible on their playback page. This is a setting authors can adjust in the privacy controls for each Haiku Deck. Learn more about allowing reuse of your decks in this article. Once you copy a presentation to your own Haiku Deck account, you can edit it as if it is your own.

 

Innovation and Presentations: Competing Against Luck with Author & Haiku Deck user Karen Dillon

As entrepreneurs, we’re always looking to draw inspiration from innovators around us. Naturally, we were excited to learn that a member of the Haiku Deck community is doing ground-breaking work related to innovation, and best of all she’s using Haiku Deck presentations to spread the word.

Karen Dillon is the former editor of Harvard Business Review and co-author of two books with Harvard Business School’s Clayton Christensen. How Will You Measure Your Life? was published in 2012. Dillon’s new book with Christensen (co-authored by Taddy Hall and Dave Duncan), Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice, is currently featured on The Wall Street Journal‘s business best-seller list.

As entrepreneurs, we were taken by Dillon and Christensen’s ideas about innovation, and in particular why innovation is so often unsuccessful, in spite of really smart people trying to get it right—and how to, instead, make it far more predictable and successful.

We’re honored that Karen took the time to answer a few questions for us, not only about her book, but also about presentations and the way she uses Haiku Deck to help spread ideas. Here’s Karen’s Haiku Deck about her new book and below excerpts from our interview:


Competing Against Luck in brief: Karen Dillon – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Haiku Deck: One of the key concepts in your book is the “Jobs to Be Done” approach. What does this mean for companies and individuals seeking to innovate in business? Does it apply outside of business?

Dillon: Clay has been working for years on what he calls the Theory of Jobs to Be Done. The idea is that well-intended innovation goes slightly wrong so often because it’s aimed at the wrong thing. We assume we just need to know more and more about the customer, but that’s not right. Just because I’m a middle-aged white woman who lives in suburban Boston doesn’t tell companies why I make the choices I do. Why did I choose to stay in an Airbnb rather than a fancy hotel when I was recently asked to speak at a conference in London? Nothing about my profile could answer that question. What could, however, is understanding what I was ‘hiring’ Airbnb to do. In our language, we say that customer ‘hire’ products or services to do a job for them. In my case, I used to live in London and I ‘hired’ Airbnb so I could feel like a local again. Understanding customers does not drive innovation success. Understanding customer jobs does. There’s a big difference.

It applies outside of business, too. I think about the ‘jobs’ people are hiring me in my life all the time. What does a boss really expect of me? What does my husband expect of me? Key to this concept is that ‘jobs’ are not just functional – they’re emotional and social, as my Airbnb example illustrates. If I can get to the essence of what ‘job’ I’ve been hired for, I’m far more likely to be successful. I think as a professional number two for a lot of years in my career, I intuitively understood that the ‘job’ I’d been hired for was to help my boss sleep well at night. He wouldn’t worry if he knew I was on top of things. That’s very different than saying my job included X and Y and Z responsibilities.

Haiku Deck: As a former Editor of Harvard Business Review, I imagine you’ve seen (and continue to see) quite a few presentations. If you had one piece of advice for all presenters, what would it be?

Dillon: Too many words! And I’m a words person. But there’s nothing more boring than watching someone more or less read bullet points off a slide deck. People don’t prune, they don’t think of the listener. They think about how they won’t mess up or forget something, but it can make for a terrible presentation – including the fact that no one will look at you when you’re speaking; they’ll watch your slides or even worse, look down at your handouts. Which are usually identical to your slides!

Haiku Deck: How do you use Haiku Deck in your work?

Dillon: I don’t make a lot of slide decks, I’m not a PowerPoint jockey. I needed a very simple tool to help me give great speeches. I wanted images that would support the point I’m trying to make and I wanted ‘reminders’ of what I was going to say. I use Haiku Deck as a backdrop, but it’s critical to being able to stand up there and do the speech. At first I tried to create a slide deck on my own, but I quickly realized finding free (and without copyright issues) images was a lot of work and I loved being able to easily explore without those worries on Haiku Deck. I like the consistent look and feel that is created. Basically, I don’t think I could easily create these slide decks – which are critical to my speeches – without Haiku Deck.

Both of Karen’s books are available on Amazon.com. Click to learn more about Competing Against Luck: The Story of Innovation and Customer Choice and How Will You Measure Your Life?

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