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New! Live Presentations for Webinars, Remote Sales, and More

If you’re looking to offer live presentations for webinars, remote sales calls, or online classes, Haiku Deck’s new Live Presentation Mode is for you! This allows you share your presentation playback from a browser to remote viewers no matter where they are or what connected device they’re using.  As the presenter navigates through slides on their web browser, the audience members will see the slides change on their screens, whether they’re across the room or across the world.

To use Live Mode, first sign into a Haiku Deck Premium account. If you’re a qualifying public-sector educator, you can get Live Mode through the Haiku Deck Classroom subscription level.

Next, visit the playback page for your presentation and look for the green GO LIVE button next to your slides.

When you click the Go Live button, you’ll see a special Live presentation URL. This is the link your audience members will need in order to join your presentation. Just copy it and share it in your meeting request, through email, or chat.

When this link is  clicked, viewers will be prompted to enter their name before they join the presentation.

The animation above shows three different browser windows. The audience-member experience is shown in the windows on the left in separate Firefox and Chrome browsers. The right side is the presenter’s view. As the presenter clicks to advance the slides, the audience stays in sync.

This feature has been tested on up to 150 simultaneous connected devices. 1:1 Classroom teachers who are familiar with products like Nearpod can use live mode in a similar fashion, driving a presentation from their device for students who are viewing from their own devices.

This works as well for desktop viewers as it does on mobile devices. It doesn’t matter if you’re presenting to someone across the board room on a browser or across the world on a connected iOS or Android device. The audience will see what you want them to see when you want them to see it. Questions? Learn more in our user guide.

8 Teacher Presentations for Winning Back to School

For many teachers in our neck of the woods it’s already time to start thinking about back to school. So much to do! So much to say! So many presentations to make! As you think about how to introduce yourself, break the ice with your students, jumpstart your curriculum, lay the groundwork for your class, and meet the parents, we’re thinking more than a couple of teacher presentations may be in order. Lucky for you, Haiku Deck is here to help! Not only do we offer qualifying educators and students 50% off via our education discount, but here are 8 teacher presentations for winning at Back to School:

  1. Make a deck to introduce yourself to students, parents, and colleagues. We love this one from teacher Mindi Vandagriff.


Who is Mindi Vandagriff? – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Have your students create a Haiku Deck to share their summer adventures. Here’s an example that educator Shannon Lewis made to inspire her students to make their own.


What I Did This Summer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

3. Create a Haiku Deck to introduce your curriculum, weekly schedule, or to share announcements. Staci Ballard made this deck to orient her students on the first day of class.


Ballard UNIV prezo – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

4. Collaborate with students on a class constitution or agreement. We were particularly inspired by this one from Susan Hennessey. 

Our Classroom Constitution – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

5. Use the Haiku Deck Curriculum Night Presentation Template to get a head start on a professional-looking presentation to “wow” the parents. To copy/edit/remix this presentation, just click the link above and look for the ‘copy’ button beneath the slides on the playback page. 

Curriculum Night Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

6. Incorporate Haiku Deck into student-led conferences. Many teachers have  students create their student-led conference guides using Haiku Deck. We’re not going to share any examples of that here, but the presentation below from Kathryn Hogg aims to inspire and prepare her class in advance of student-led conferences. 

Student Led Conferences – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

7. Create your own educational manifesto. This one from Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie has racked up over 20,000 views since he first shared it online in 2013. 

The New Mind Set – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

8. Inspire your class with a Haiku Deck biography or quote collection like this one from Anna Stirling. You can even download as a .pdf file and print out the presentation to decorate your classroom.

Inspirational Quotes – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

How are you winning at Back to School with Haiku Deck teacher presentations? Drop us a line so we can share yours in the featured gallery! Just send a link to team@haikudeck.com. Hungry for more educator resources? Remember to visit our Education page at www.haikudeck.com/education.

 

10 Tips for Nailing Your Next Conference Presentation

We understand that making a presentation for a big meeting or conference can be more than a little anxiety provoking- that’s often why people turn to Haiku Deck in the first place. Regardless of the software you choose, we’ve combed our creative community to find best practices from conference keynote speakers, meeting organizers, speech writers, and others… All as part of mission to make presentations 10x faster and easier. Hopefully we can make them 10x less nerve wracking too. From figuring out what you’re going to say, to designing your presentation, to delivering your talk, these tips and tricks are just what you need make the most of your next conference presentation.


10 Tips for Nailing Your Conference Presentation – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

  1. Consider your audience first. Too often, speakers start by asking, “What do I want to say?” Instead, experts recommend that you think about what your audience hopes to get from your presentation. Even when you’ve got your own important agenda , putting your audience first it will help you frame the message to better connect and have greater impact.
  2. Create an outline. Organizing your ideas in an outline before you get down to presentation creation is a great way to save time. Not only do outlines force you to get your thoughts organized, but this way you avoid the distraction of formatting and image selection before it’s time. Think about the one important thing that you want your audience to remember at the end of your talk. Try to organize around this theme and build your outline to support your big idea. Of course, once you have your outline, you’re welcome to use Haiku Deck Zuru to convert your outline into a deck. Most of the time, Haiku Deck Zuru will get you 50-80% of the way from outline to presentation in just a few minutes.
  3. Boil it Down… 1 idea at a time: Perhaps the biggest mistake conference speakers make is trying to share too much all at once. Remember: Even the most important and interesting information has to be shared at a pace that the audience can absorb. Think of your slides as billboards on the side of the highway. They should include few words that reinforce the ideas that you’re sharing. If your slides have too many words, your audience will have to choose between either reading what’s on the screen or listening to you. Our brains cannot read detailed information on a slide and listen at the same time, so try not to force your audience to make this choice.
  4. Choose evocative images: The research shows that people remember pictures better than words. When your slides include evocative images that illustrate your idea, it creates a tool that your listeners can fall back on for remembering what you said.  That’s why beautiful imagery is at the center of Haiku Deck presentations and why we recommend choosing a mix of images to stimulate your audience and deliver impact.
  5. Tell a story: More than anything, Listeners remember how you make them feel during a presentation. That’s because humans are hardwired to engage with and remember stories more than other information. Creating an emotional connection between your idea through a well told story is the number one way to make your conference presentation more powerful. If you can illustrate your story with relevant imagery or a physical artifact, all the better.
  6. Engage your audience: One great way to engage an audience or to reengage an audience in the middle of your talk is to ask a question or encourage audience participation. Talking with your audience helps to draw them in and breaks the pace of a talk, even if just asking for a “quick show of hands” can make a difference. Encouraging the audience to ask questions or discuss via social channels like Twitter can also be a good way to extend the reach of your ideas beyond the room where you’re speaking.
  7. Think about transitions between topics: Even the best outlines can have some rough transitions as you move from one part of your talk to the next. The best way to handle these transitions is to practice them in advance. We also recommend thinking the use of stories and audience engagement as tools for moving the audience from one part of your presentation to the next.
  8. Remember the Golden Rule: Do you like listening to someone read off their slides word-for-word? Neither do we.. Same goes for tiny font, mismatched colors, obnoxious animations, and horrible clip art. If you’re using Haiku Deck, we know you’re not doing this, but just in case you’re new here, please do your audience a favor and treat them the way you wish to be treated when you’re the listener.
  9. Craft a strong finish with an inspiring call to action: If your speech ends with, “…and that’s all I’ve got, any questions?” then you’re doing it wrong. In addition to summarizing your big idea as a reminder to listeners, think about ending your talk with a provocative question or call to action. Inspire your audience with a solution that can be achieved with their participation.
  10. Share your deck  through social media: To get the most from your hard work, be sure to share your deck through Twitter, Facebook, email, and any other channel you can. To maximize the reach, remember to include the event hashtag to achieve maximum visibility for your work.

Of course, we would be remiss if we didn’t share with your our Killer Speech template, embedded below, which anyone can open, copy, and edit as their own.


Killer Speech Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Conference Presentation Tips for attendees, speakers, and organizers

If you’re speaking at conferences or events this season, we know conference presentations are never easy. Your audience will thank you for using Haiku Deck to simplify your message. But even if you’re not the one taking the stage as a keynote speaker, there are tons of ways to make the most of a conference experience using Haiku Deck to learn, spread ideas and build your network.

As we look forward to this month’s I.S.T.E. conference (see you there?), we wanted to share some tips and tricks to help conference presenters and even regular conference attendees make the most of the experience.

Before the Event

Haiku Deck is a great way to drive awareness and excitement for a conference ahead of time. You can easily embed Haiku Decks in your blog or website and share them on social channels. Don’t forget to use the event’s hashtag! Here’s a Haiku Deck we made to build buzz for the ISTE2017 conference:


ISTE 2017 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Tips and best practices:

More “before the event” Haiku Decks:

During the Event

You can also use Haiku Deck as a fun and unique idea-sharing tool, to capture quotable gems and circulate them with your networks.

You can create a Haiku Deck recap of a particular talk, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Wendy Townley at the ALT Summit:


Alt Summit SLC 2013: Personal Branding – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
Another approach is to create a “highlights” Haiku Deck, with sound bites from a wide range of speakers. Here’s an example we made while sitting in the audience at the XConomy Mobile Madness Northwest Forum:


XConomy Forum Sound Bites – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Tips and best practices:

  • Consider creating the first few slides of your deck to set context in advance, so you can give the speaker(s) your full attention.
  • If there’s an event hashtag, keep an eye out for photos attendees have taken that you can incorporate into your deck, or sound bites you might have missed. (Bonus: Tweets are usually short enough to fit on a Haik Deck slide.)
  • You can even make a Haiku Deck of sound bites if you’re following along virtually, via Twitter and an event hashtag–I created this one, of the closing keynote at IntegratED PDX, on the train since I couldn’t be in the room during the talk.

More “during the event” Haiku Decks:

Post-Event Haiku Decks

There’s no better way to share what you’ve learned, key observations, trends, or things that inspired you than with a Haiku Deck wrap-up for your colleagues who couldn’t attend. As you review your notes, you can build a deck that captures your experience, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie:

How to Enrich Conferences and Events with Haiku Deck

Click to view the full Haiku Deck with notes

Tips and best practices:

More “After the Event” Haiku Decks:

The Main Event

Of course, if you are up on stage, and you are using Haiku Deck for your slides (Hai-5!), don’t forget to share them with the event attendees using the social share and embed buttons–and with us! Send a link to your deck to gallery@haikudeck.com, and we’ll consider them for our Featured or Popular Gallery.

How do you Haiku Deck in the Classroom?

With millions of teachers and students using Haiku Deck in over 15,000 schools around the world, we’re inspired each day by the different ways our users get the most from Haiku Deck. With Haiku Deck Classroom now available, teachers can get even more out of the app by creating courses and inviting students to join. Are you doing something special to make your classroom presentations more exciting? Here’s a few recent posts that show how Haiku Deck is used in education from primary-level, to adult education and professional development. Drop us a line and tell us how you use Haiku Deck in the classroom.

 

Haiku Deck Classroom Brings Haiku Deck Presentations to Students and Teachers

With back to school season in full swing, we couldn’t be happier to announce a brand-new offering for educators, Haiku Deck Classroom.  Over the past 4 years, we’ve seen over a hundred thousand teachers, librarians, and education technology professionals from 15,000 schools (from primary to universities) embrace Haiku Deck. They use the app for creating inspiring lessons on any topic, teaching presentation best-practices, and even running curriculum nights or staff meetings. We built Haiku Deck Classroom to bring the full power of Haiku Deck Pro to educators and students in a way that’s easy and, more importantly, affordable even for teachers on the tightest of budgets.

Haiku Deck Classroom makes all the features of Haiku Deck Pro available to educators and students, including unlimited presentation creation, advanced privacy settings, offline viewing and printing, and YouTube video embedding. The subscription applies to use of Haiku Deck’s award-winning web, iPad, and iPhone apps. Here’s a 1 minute video introduction of Haiku Deck Classroom:

Additional features include:

    • Classroom Management Dashboard: Educators can easily add and remove students from their classroom by email address.
    • Mobile and Web-Based: Educators and students can create or view Haiku Decks on the web, iPad, or iPhone.
    • The option of Google Classroom integration: Educators who use Google Classroom may import users from and share decks directly to Google Classroom.
    • The option of using Google Sign-In: Haiku Deck now supports Google sign-in, for students without an email address.
    • Course Gallery: Students can share Haiku Decks to a classroom gallery, making it easy for teachers to review and evaluate work.
    • Share to LMS: Students can easily share their Haiku Decks to Classroom Management Systems like Schoology, Moodle, Blackboard, Canvas, Edmodo, and more.  

Haiku Deck Classroom is offered at an introductory price of just $99/year for a teacher and up to 150 students with the option of adding student licenses. Department, school, and district pricing is also available.

To learn more about Haiku Deck Classroom and to purchase or upgrade, visit www.haikudeck.com/getclassroom or for technical information about the product, please visit the Haiku Deck Classroom section of the Haiku Deck user guide.

As with all product updates, we’d love to hear your feedback! Please drop us a line if you’ve got questions or ideas for ways we can improve Haiku Deck Classroom in the future.

Haiku Deck Supports Google Sign-In

We’re happy to announce that Haiku Deck for web, iPad and iPhone now supports Google Sign-In for logging into the app on the web, iPad, and iPhone. This is especially exciting for educators with students who use Google IDs in lieu of email addresses as it provides an all-new way for users to create accounts without using an email address.

To create an account using your Google sign-in, just look for the Google logo on the sign in page on the web app, iPad or iPhone apps.

If you’re already using your Google sign-in email to sign into Haiku Deck, you should continue to sign in as you always have, by typing your email address and password.

googlesigninIPAD

This is the latest in an ongoing effort to make Haiku Deck work better for teachers who use the app in the classroom for a wide range of activities. If you missed it earlier this year we added ‘share to Google Classroom‘ as a feature of our share tool.

If you’re an educator looking for inspiration on different ways to use Haiku Deck in your work, check out some of the examples and templates below:

How are you using Haiku Deck in your classroom? We’d love to hear from you!

How Teacher, Education Consultant, Author, and TEDx Presenter Mary Myatt Uses Haiku Deck To Plan Lessons and Talks

Recently we observed veteran teacher, education adviser, and author Mary Myatt on Twitter talking with a colleague about how she uses Haiku Deck in teaching lessons and planning.  Given her success as an author, TEDx presenter, teacher, and education consultant, we were inspired to learn more about her work and share her unique experience using Haiku Deck in her work.

Mary works in schools across the United Kingdom, talking to students, teachers and leaders about learning, leadership and the curriculum. With over 20 years of experience, she has taught religious education, English, Latin and Greek in secondary schools. She has also done work to support school improvement and curriculum development for local districts, dioceses and others.

Guest Q&A

What inspired you to start using Haiku Deck?

I noticed a presentation on Twitter and was struck by the quality of the images. I saw it was by Haiku Deck, downloaded and got going. It is a complete counterpoint to the heavy handed, clunky, cumbersome alternatives. It transformed my presentations, not only in terms of aesthetics but also in terms of the clarity of my thinking.

What is your approach for using Haiku Deck with Lesson Planning?

I use Haiku Deck for conveying the main concepts in my keynotes, presentations and seminars. I find that linking the key words and concepts to an image does two things: it helps me to clarify my thinking and it gives my audience a powerful hook that links to the main ideas. The pictures and images produce a stimulus for discussion and as a result I have an insight into their points of view and can adjust my talk accordingly.
(here’s an example of one of Mary’s Haiku Decks)

Copy of Gathering evidence – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

What are some other ways you think teachers could benefit from using Haiku Deck in the classroom?

Providing images which link to the key concepts to be taught provides high challenge and low threat for students. It is high challenge, because they have to make the links between an image and an idea; it is also low threat because all responses are legitimate. This means that teachers have an insight into their students’ thinking. There has been some interesting work developed by The National Gallery in London on ‘Take One Picture.’

Your book focuses on lessons school management teams can learn from leaders in other sectors. Can you share some of the key ideas from your research that would be helpful to the educators who use Haiku Deck in their schools?

I’ve written extensively about a few ideas on my blog. Some relevant posts include, Focusing on the essentials,  High challenge, low threat,  and On trust.

You mentioned that you used Haiku Deck TEDx Norwich in March 2016. What did you do to prepare for that talk? What kind of feedback did you get from members of the audience afterwards?

I distilled my ideas down to the key points I wanted to convey. I decided not to use any text, and talked just to the images. I edited my ideas down to the key essentials and Haiku Deck helped me to do this. Some feedback from my talk is captured on Storify

Thank you, Mary for sharing your experience with us! If you’d like to view Mary’s inspiring TEDx Norwich Talk, click below. Also, follow Mary Myatt on Twitter and visit her web site to learn more about her work. To view more of Mary’s Haiku Decks, visit her Haiku Deck user profile page.

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