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AuthorAdam Tratt

Your Feedback Matters!

Whether you’ve been with us for a while or are new to the Haiku Deck community, hopefully you know that we spend ALOT of time listening to customer feedback with an eye toward improving the experience. In software, there’s always more work to be done, and we rely on you to be our guide.

If you’re having trouble with the app or just wish that it did something differently, please leave us a ticket through our support site or write us an email at support@haikudeck.com.

If you love Haiku Deck, will you share your enthusiasm and help us spread the word? Authentic product reviews help us more than you know. Here are a few places:

  • For the Haiku Deck web app, please leave us a review on the Chrome store or G2Crowd.
  • If you use the iPad or iPhone app, please leave us a review on iTunes (open the App Store on your device and search for Haiku Deck, the click write a review).

Looking for inspiration? Here’s some kind words our users have shared about the Haiku Deck Web App.


HAIKU DECK WEB APP: TOP TWEETS – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

 

Curate & Organize Presentation Collections

We are pleased to announce Haiku Deck Presentation Collections, a new feature on the web that lets you curate and organize presentations that you or others create for your own use or for sharing with others. Only paying subscribers can create Haiku Presentation Deck Collections, but anyone can view a Haiku Deck Presentation Collection, regardless of whether or not they are a subscriber.

Here are the primary ways to use Collections:

  1. Use Haiku Deck Collections to organize your own Haiku Decks: If you’re a teacher, you might want to have a collection of Decks for each class or unit. If you’re a professional, you might want to have a collection for functional decks like ‘sales pitches,’ ‘status updates,’ or ‘strategic plans.’ If you’re a real estate agent you might create a collection of ‘listing presentations,’ ‘comparative marketing analyses,’ and ‘team update’ Haiku Decks.
  2. Use Haiku Deck Collections to curate and share decks you create and/or public Haiku Decks that others create for sharing: Using the Haiku Deck Gallery Search or links that other Haiku Deck users share with you, you can create collections that are for sharing with others. For example, an event organizer or attendee can share collections of Haiku Decks from a conference or meeting or an educator can search for a topic to create subject-matter collections related to a curriculum.
  3. Use Haiku Deck Collections to curate and save decks you might want to use for inspiration later on: Let’s say you’re surfing the Haiku Deck gallery and you find a deck that inspires you. Just copy the URL and add it to a collection so you can easily find it for reference later on.

Only paying Haiku Deck subscribers can create collections, but anyone can view a collection when they have a link to it. If a deck is added to a collection and later made private by the author, it will be automatically removed from the Collection.

Learn how to create Haiku Deck Collections in our user guide.

Learn more in the Haiku Deck Collections FAQ

We’d love to see the presentation collections you create! Send us a link at gallery@haikudeck.com.

New! Presentation Analytics from Haiku Deck

We are pleased to announce a new feature for Haiku Deck Premium subscribers, Presentation Analytics. If you’re using presentations to raise money or sell or conduct marketing, this is a great new way to see how your presentation content is being consumed by viewers and to get notified when key people engage with your Haiku Decks.

Invitations: Allows you to create a custom link to send to anyone in order to get in-depth analytics based on their actions related to your Haiku Deck. Presentation Analytics will track when the invitation is clicked, how long the viewer spent looking at the deck, and trigger an email notification to you when the link is clicked.

Recent Viewers: Provides high-level data on recent viewers of your individual decks or all of your decks in aggregate. This includes time spent on the deck(s), the location of the viewer, the date and time of their visit.

Views: Provides a line chart showing the number of views received for the deck and time frame you select.

Downloads: Shows a line chart of all of the downloads that you deck has received over the selected time period.

Shares: Show the number of shares of your deck to different social media platforms via the share buttons on the playback page. Specifically, you will see the number of shares of your deck to Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google Plus, Google Classroom, as well as the number of time a link to your deck has been copied.

Though Presentation Analytics will apply to all of your Haiku Decks, data for this feature is only available beginning from the start of Presentation Analytics tracking on September 15, 2017. Learn more about Presentation Analytics in the Haiku Deck user guide.

As with any new feature, we’re eager to hear your feedback! Click here to learn more about Haiku Deck Premium and to upgrade. Also, if you’re a qualifying nonprofit, be sure to take advantage of our 50% off pricing. Drop us a line at team@haikudeck.com and let us know what you think!

 

Get 40 Million Free Presentation Images for Microsoft PowerPoint with Haiku Decks Add-In

Who doesn’t want free presentation images for Powerpoint? Millions of users already turn to Haiku Deck as a huge time-saver when it comes to sourcing great images and finding great presentation design. But we know that sometimes users have to work in PowerPoint, and now we’ve got a solution for you!

Now with Haiku Deck Add-In for Microsoft PowerPoint, we bring  40 million+  world-class presentation images to PowerPoint so you can get your work done faster even when you’re not using Haiku Deck.

Just as with Haiku Deck’s award-winning web and iOS apps, the presentation images found in our search results are all high-quality, royalty-free images licensed under the Creative Commons license. In order to comply with the Creative Commons license, users must include attribution and license information for the photos they include in their work.

Not only do we help you find great images, but the add-in automatically provides the license details and attribution information for you to copy/paste either as a note, footnote, or onto an attribution slide at the end of your presentation. Please remember, the deal with Creative Commons photos is that the photographer is licensing their work to you in exchange for you giving them credit for their work. Please be respectful of their copyrights and take a moment to learn about the various flavors of the Creative Commons license here.

The add in also helps you find presentation templates created by members of our community and shared publicly through the Haiku Deck Gallery. Anyone can search for and find presentation templates and examples through the add-in. Paying Haiku Deck subscribers have the added benefit of being able to download editable versions of presentations they find, saving countless hours of presentation authoring.

The add-in works in PowerPoint 2013 Service Pack 1 or later, PowerPoint 2016 for Mac, PowerPoint 2016 or later, PowerPoint Online. Go and get your free presentation images for Powerpoint by downloading the Haiku Deck add-in here. While you’re there, please leave us a review if you like the add-in, and if you have additional questions learn more in the Haiku Deck User Guide.

How Real Estate Agents Ace their Listing Presentations with Haiku Deck

We were pleasantly surprised to recently see Haiku Deck hailed yet again by real estate technology blog Inman as a way for agents to ace their listing presentations. We’ve known this ever since one of our earliest fans told the same publication about the time he used Haiku Deck to score a $1.4M property listing.

Turns out thousands of real estate professionals are using Haiku Deck for all kinds of presentations from market trends analyses to comparative market reports, to decks that showcase a neighborhood, to professional profiles or vacation rental marketing materials.  Aside from the fact  that Haiku Deck works great with iPad and iPhone (as well as the web), realtors love that sales and marketing materials can be easily shared through social media, embedded in blog posts, shared with clients as links, or downloaded to .pdf or .pptx formats for offline sharing and printing.

We’ve collected templates that can be instantly copied and customized, testimonial quotes, and more information on our real estate page, but thought we’d also share some of what we’re hearing on Twitter from real estate professionals around the world. If you’re using Haiku Deck to drive your real estate business, will you tell us your story? Drop us an email at team@haikudeck.com.

New! Live Presentations for Webinars, Remote Sales, and More

If you’re looking to offer live presentations for webinars, remote sales calls, or online classes, Haiku Deck’s new Live Presentation Mode is for you! This allows you share your presentation playback from a browser to remote viewers no matter where they are or what connected device they’re using.  As the presenter navigates through slides on their web browser, the audience members will see the slides change on their screens, whether they’re across the room or across the world.

To use Live Mode, first sign into a Haiku Deck Premium account. If you’re a qualifying public-sector educator, you can get Live Mode through the Haiku Deck Classroom subscription level.

Next, visit the playback page for your presentation and look for the green GO LIVE button next to your slides.

When you click the Go Live button, you’ll see a special Live presentation URL. This is the link your audience members will need in order to join your presentation. Just copy it and share it in your meeting request, through email, or chat.

When this link is  clicked, viewers will be prompted to enter their name before they join the presentation.

The animation above shows three different browser windows. The audience-member experience is shown in the windows on the left in separate Firefox and Chrome browsers. The right side is the presenter’s view. As the presenter clicks to advance the slides, the audience stays in sync.

This feature has been tested on up to 150 simultaneous connected devices. 1:1 Classroom teachers who are familiar with products like Nearpod can use live mode in a similar fashion, driving a presentation from their device for students who are viewing from their own devices.

This works as well for desktop viewers as it does on mobile devices. It doesn’t matter if you’re presenting to someone across the board room on a browser or across the world on a connected iOS or Android device. The audience will see what you want them to see when you want them to see it. Questions? Learn more in our user guide.

Expert Presentation Tips from “The Communicator,” Gina London

At Haiku Deck, we’re all about helping you make presentations like an expert and, as part of that mission, we’re always searching for accomplished communicators and presenters from around the world. I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Gina London, an Emmy winning former CNN correspondent and anchor who is now an internationally recognized communications strategist and consultant.  Author, speaker and writer of the weekly business column, “The Communicator” in Ireland’s largest circulated newspaper, The Sunday Independent, Gina is a Director with Fuzion Communications and an American who now calls Ireland home. Here’s what she had to say about delivering your message like an expert:

What is something you learned as a CNN correspondent and anchor that helps you with your communication clients?

Above all, I know how to take any topic and break it down into a memorable story and deliver it confidently.

The rigor of CNN’s 24-hour news cycle made me extremely adept at crystalizing. This means more than oversimplifying, it’s the skill to be able to synthesize the main points of something complex.

Too often,  business professionals “over-present.”  Their audience is taken on a meandering brain dump of information overload that leaves them guessing at the presenter’s main point, or perhaps worse, inferring the take-away on their own.

To be an effective communicator in the business world, you must be able to strategize about the main point your particular audience needs to know and then connect on that.   

If you had to name one thing that most communicators could do to improve the way their message lands, what would it be?

Hook any informational point to a human, emotional story.

I learned in CNN anchor training school – yes, there is such a thing – to remember that behind any story – no matter how seemingly dry – there are hopes, dreams or fears.

As a journalist, that didn’t mean to evoke or over dramatize, but to keep the real people in your audience top of mind.

In business, it’s the same.  Until the robots take over, real human people are in the room with you as a presenter.  So, I urge my executive clients to connect any point they want to make to a personal anecdote, illustration or example.

“Stories make messages stick” goes the cliché.  But it’s true.  Science shows that our brain lights up more receptors when we’re told stories that include additional sensory areas like descriptions of weather, feelings, vacations. Things we relate to on a human level.

When you give talks, what topics do you cover? (can you include links to any of your Haiku Decks for us to embed in the blog post?)

From Lagos, to London to Austin to Cairo, in addition to assisting my clients in crafting their own dynamic presentations, I speak at conferences all around the world on a wide-variety of communications and confidence topics.

I’ve presented on helping science and tech professionals connect with broader audiences to improving work-life balance, developing your professional and personal brand and taking control of your body language.  Crisis communications. The power of story-telling. Employee engagement. How not to sound like a robot. If it has to do with communications, I’m there!

I like my slides to be enhance and embroider what I say.  The themes of my images add another layer of interest to my talk.  Here’s my deck that recently backed me up for a lively, interactive presentation before the Dublin Chamber of Commerce. You’ll see, I chose a lot of funny, vintage shots for this one.


Network Dublin Body Language Nov 2016 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

But I don’t always.   My recent work/life balance presentation used shots from Cirque du Soleil as I talked about how we can all learn to “juggle.” Get it? Ha. Never mind. I promise, it was a fun presentation too. Oh, and I actually juggled three oranges at the end of it. Really. And didn’t drop.

As a public speaker, what are three things you do to get ready for a successful presentation?

I use the “AIM” approach and coach my clients to do this too.  AIM stands for Audience, Intent, Message.

First, really analyze who is in your audience. What are their hopes, dreams and fears? How can you best connect with them?  Put them first!  Then narrow your intent to a single action. What do you want your audience to really take away from your presentation? Too often, I find presenters don’t have this clearly defined and they try to do too much.

Finally, after deciding around points one and two, I craft a story to deliver a message that connects, captivates and is clear.

If you’re message isn’t memorable, then what was the point?

What’s your process for pulling a talk and accompanying slides together?

After I complete my AIM analysis, I think about the hook or the one or two stories I will weave throughout the presentation.

For instance, even if you’re going to be presenting a quarterly progress report, think about how much more fun – and therefore memorable – for your audience if you open with a personal or relatable story.

Like, you can’t believe you dinged your car over the weekend and how different the three estimates from three different mechanics were.  Then you segue from that – to the different projections your company heard from various investors – or something like that.

Then at the close of your numbers report, you refer back to you opening anecdote and reveal to your audience how much your car repair is going to cost and which garage you chose. Or that you just bought a new car? Or something.  This is called “the donut” approach to writing, and a simple, but useful device to retain your audience throughout a presentation.

People start to listen more and connect more because they can relate to the personal hook. Plus they’re shocked you’re not just jumping in with the typical “blah blah numbers, numbers.”

How did you first find out about Haiku Deck? 

Great question. I found PowerPoint extremely difficult to use.   There were too many choices and I was going bonkers trying to make my slides look professional.

I’m no graphics designer, but I knew that my arial font on a generic template looked icky.  Everything was looking too ‘PowerPointy.’ Exasperated, I Googled “Alternative Presentation Platforms” and Eureka!

I’ve been Haiku Deck Pro going on three years now and have created nearly a hundred unique decks.  I love it.

What reaction do you get from your audience when you speak at a conference or address a group? Do people notice your slides? 

I am always noticed as one who stands out from the norm.  The upbeat, fresh style of Haiku Deck matches my delivery style.

While I now have a graphics team I can farm things out to, I still make my own presentations because I don’t have to wait for the team to turn something around or try to imagine what look I’m going for. I can do it on my own more speedily – and still look like a graphics team did it!

The professional look combined with ease of use make Haiku Deck a game changer for me – and my clients.

How would you describe Haiku Deck to your clients?

I recommend Haiku Deck to all my clients. I tell them it’s super-easy to use and they will shake up their next employee or investor meeting or whatever  in a way that is extremely positive.  Every client who has tried Haiku Deck has thanked me.

What advice can you offer to Haiku Deck’s community as they think about their next public speaking engagement?

If you have taken the time to create a beautiful slide deck with Haiku Deck, you owe it to your audience to deliver in the same way. Practice out loud. Get off script. Tell stories to personally connect.  Have fun!  And get presentation coaching. Connect with me! Okay, I know. Shameless self promotion.

In short, Haiku Deck helps you “be the movie, not the book” – and that’s what all audiences hope they’ll receive when they sit down for a presentation.

Thanks, Gina, for taking the time to share your wisdom with our community! To learn more about using Haiku Deck to create expert presentations, visit www.haikudeck.com or download our free iOS app from the iTunes app store.

8 Teacher Presentations for Winning Back to School

For many teachers in our neck of the woods it’s already time to start thinking about back to school. So much to do! So much to say! So many presentations to make! As you think about how to introduce yourself, break the ice with your students, jumpstart your curriculum, lay the groundwork for your class, and meet the parents, we’re thinking more than a couple of teacher presentations may be in order. Lucky for you, Haiku Deck is here to help! Not only do we offer qualifying educators and students 50% off via our education discount, but here are 8 teacher presentations for winning at Back to School:

  1. Make a deck to introduce yourself to students, parents, and colleagues. We love this one from teacher Mindi Vandagriff.


Who is Mindi Vandagriff? – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

2. Have your students create a Haiku Deck to share their summer adventures. Here’s an example that educator Shannon Lewis made to inspire her students to make their own.


What I Did This Summer – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

3. Create a Haiku Deck to introduce your curriculum, weekly schedule, or to share announcements. Staci Ballard made this deck to orient her students on the first day of class.


Ballard UNIV prezo – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

4. Collaborate with students on a class constitution or agreement. We were particularly inspired by this one from Susan Hennessey. 

Our Classroom Constitution – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

5. Use the Haiku Deck Curriculum Night Presentation Template to get a head start on a professional-looking presentation to “wow” the parents. To copy/edit/remix this presentation, just click the link above and look for the ‘copy’ button beneath the slides on the playback page. 

Curriculum Night Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

6. Incorporate Haiku Deck into student-led conferences. Many teachers have  students create their student-led conference guides using Haiku Deck. We’re not going to share any examples of that here, but the presentation below from Kathryn Hogg aims to inspire and prepare her class in advance of student-led conferences. 

Student Led Conferences – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

7. Create your own educational manifesto. This one from Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie has racked up over 20,000 views since he first shared it online in 2013. 

The New Mind Set – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

8. Inspire your class with a Haiku Deck biography or quote collection like this one from Anna Stirling. You can even download as a .pdf file and print out the presentation to decorate your classroom.

Inspirational Quotes – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

How are you winning at Back to School with Haiku Deck teacher presentations? Drop us a line so we can share yours in the featured gallery! Just send a link to team@haikudeck.com. Hungry for more educator resources? Remember to visit our Education page at www.haikudeck.com/education.

 

10 Tips for Nailing Your Next Conference Presentation

We understand that making a presentation for a big meeting or conference can be more than a little anxiety provoking- that’s often why people turn to Haiku Deck in the first place. Regardless of the software you choose, we’ve combed our creative community to find best practices from conference keynote speakers, meeting organizers, speech writers, and others… All as part of mission to make presentations 10x faster and easier. Hopefully we can make them 10x less nerve wracking too. From figuring out what you’re going to say, to designing your presentation, to delivering your talk, these tips and tricks are just what you need make the most of your next conference presentation.


10 Tips for Nailing Your Conference Presentation – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

  1. Consider your audience first. Too often, speakers start by asking, “What do I want to say?” Instead, experts recommend that you think about what your audience hopes to get from your presentation. Even when you’ve got your own important agenda , putting your audience first it will help you frame the message to better connect and have greater impact.
  2. Create an outline. Organizing your ideas in an outline before you get down to presentation creation is a great way to save time. Not only do outlines force you to get your thoughts organized, but this way you avoid the distraction of formatting and image selection before it’s time. Think about the one important thing that you want your audience to remember at the end of your talk. Try to organize around this theme and build your outline to support your big idea. Of course, once you have your outline, you’re welcome to use Haiku Deck Zuru to convert your outline into a deck. Most of the time, Haiku Deck Zuru will get you 50-80% of the way from outline to presentation in just a few minutes.
  3. Boil it Down… 1 idea at a time: Perhaps the biggest mistake conference speakers make is trying to share too much all at once. Remember: Even the most important and interesting information has to be shared at a pace that the audience can absorb. Think of your slides as billboards on the side of the highway. They should include few words that reinforce the ideas that you’re sharing. If your slides have too many words, your audience will have to choose between either reading what’s on the screen or listening to you. Our brains cannot read detailed information on a slide and listen at the same time, so try not to force your audience to make this choice.
  4. Choose evocative images: The research shows that people remember pictures better than words. When your slides include evocative images that illustrate your idea, it creates a tool that your listeners can fall back on for remembering what you said.  That’s why beautiful imagery is at the center of Haiku Deck presentations and why we recommend choosing a mix of images to stimulate your audience and deliver impact.
  5. Tell a story: More than anything, Listeners remember how you make them feel during a presentation. That’s because humans are hardwired to engage with and remember stories more than other information. Creating an emotional connection between your idea through a well told story is the number one way to make your conference presentation more powerful. If you can illustrate your story with relevant imagery or a physical artifact, all the better.
  6. Engage your audience: One great way to engage an audience or to reengage an audience in the middle of your talk is to ask a question or encourage audience participation. Talking with your audience helps to draw them in and breaks the pace of a talk, even if just asking for a “quick show of hands” can make a difference. Encouraging the audience to ask questions or discuss via social channels like Twitter can also be a good way to extend the reach of your ideas beyond the room where you’re speaking.
  7. Think about transitions between topics: Even the best outlines can have some rough transitions as you move from one part of your talk to the next. The best way to handle these transitions is to practice them in advance. We also recommend thinking the use of stories and audience engagement as tools for moving the audience from one part of your presentation to the next.
  8. Remember the Golden Rule: Do you like listening to someone read off their slides word-for-word? Neither do we.. Same goes for tiny font, mismatched colors, obnoxious animations, and horrible clip art. If you’re using Haiku Deck, we know you’re not doing this, but just in case you’re new here, please do your audience a favor and treat them the way you wish to be treated when you’re the listener.
  9. Craft a strong finish with an inspiring call to action: If your speech ends with, “…and that’s all I’ve got, any questions?” then you’re doing it wrong. In addition to summarizing your big idea as a reminder to listeners, think about ending your talk with a provocative question or call to action. Inspire your audience with a solution that can be achieved with their participation.
  10. Share your deck  through social media: To get the most from your hard work, be sure to share your deck through Twitter, Facebook, email, and any other channel you can. To maximize the reach, remember to include the event hashtag to achieve maximum visibility for your work.

Of course, we would be remiss if we didn’t share with your our Killer Speech template, embedded below, which anyone can open, copy, and edit as their own.


Killer Speech Template – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Conference Presentation Tips for attendees, speakers, and organizers

If you’re speaking at conferences or events this season, we know conference presentations are never easy. Your audience will thank you for using Haiku Deck to simplify your message. But even if you’re not the one taking the stage as a keynote speaker, there are tons of ways to make the most of a conference experience using Haiku Deck to learn, spread ideas and build your network.

As we look forward to this month’s I.S.T.E. conference (see you there?), we wanted to share some tips and tricks to help conference presenters and even regular conference attendees make the most of the experience.

Before the Event

Haiku Deck is a great way to drive awareness and excitement for a conference ahead of time. You can easily embed Haiku Decks in your blog or website and share them on social channels. Don’t forget to use the event’s hashtag! Here’s a Haiku Deck we made to build buzz for the ISTE2017 conference:


ISTE 2017 – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires

Tips and best practices:

More “before the event” Haiku Decks:

During the Event

You can also use Haiku Deck as a fun and unique idea-sharing tool, to capture quotable gems and circulate them with your networks.

You can create a Haiku Deck recap of a particular talk, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Wendy Townley at the ALT Summit:


Alt Summit SLC 2013: Personal Branding – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;
Another approach is to create a “highlights” Haiku Deck, with sound bites from a wide range of speakers. Here’s an example we made while sitting in the audience at the XConomy Mobile Madness Northwest Forum:


XConomy Forum Sound Bites – Created with Haiku Deck, presentation software that inspires;

Tips and best practices:

  • Consider creating the first few slides of your deck to set context in advance, so you can give the speaker(s) your full attention.
  • If there’s an event hashtag, keep an eye out for photos attendees have taken that you can incorporate into your deck, or sound bites you might have missed. (Bonus: Tweets are usually short enough to fit on a Haik Deck slide.)
  • You can even make a Haiku Deck of sound bites if you’re following along virtually, via Twitter and an event hashtag–I created this one, of the closing keynote at IntegratED PDX, on the train since I couldn’t be in the room during the talk.

More “during the event” Haiku Decks:

Post-Event Haiku Decks

There’s no better way to share what you’ve learned, key observations, trends, or things that inspired you than with a Haiku Deck wrap-up for your colleagues who couldn’t attend. As you review your notes, you can build a deck that captures your experience, like this one by Haiku Deck Guru Simon McKenzie:

How to Enrich Conferences and Events with Haiku Deck

Click to view the full Haiku Deck with notes

Tips and best practices:

More “After the Event” Haiku Decks:

The Main Event

Of course, if you are up on stage, and you are using Haiku Deck for your slides (Hai-5!), don’t forget to share them with the event attendees using the social share and embed buttons–and with us! Send a link to your deck to gallery@haikudeck.com, and we’ll consider them for our Featured or Popular Gallery.

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